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Being brave!

(13 posts)
  • Started 8 years ago by Katerina
  • Latest reply from Jean Strange
  1. Katerina
    Member

    I bought a lovely John Clayton kit from Heritage Crafts, called High and Dry - it's a scene with yachts and trees - and it came with 14 count Aida fabric. But I noticed that it has fractional stitches - half and quarter (well what they call half and quarter, they are full crosses, just narrower or tinier) so, I plucked up the courage to buy some evenweave material and do it on that instead.

    This is only the second cross stitch I've done, and I have to say it is causing me some difficulties as I have a problem counting to get the right holes because they are so small. I've already had to take part of it out twice and start again.

    It's quite a complicated challenging pattern, so I probably shouldn't have tried to run before I can walk, but it's certainly teaching me some patience! Lol.

    Kat x

    Posted 8 years ago #
  2. Brigitte Gant
    Member

    Hi, Katerina, I applaud you for swapping the Aida for evenweave, which I do often especially when some material is showing. Evenweave or linen looks so much better - my opinion. The trick is with evenweave or linen NOT to count the holes, but the threads. It works for me, as I had the same problem which you are experiencing right now.
    I just completed 'Early Shift' from Heritage, but as it is stitched all over, I did use the enclosed Aida. I managed the squashed crosses ok, but had to use the magnifier to make sure that I hit the centre of the Aida square. Don't give up, it will get easier with practice.

    Posted 8 years ago #
  3. Jean Strange
    Member

    Hi Katerina, well done for swapping the fabric! I know what you mean about the "squashed" stitches that they call half cross stitches. There are a couple of designers who use these. Years ago I did a picture of a fly fisherman for my husband that used them and also a map sampler I seem to remember and yes they are confusing but keep at it as they results are worth it. The fly fisherman nearly drove me mad as it was also in lots of shades of brown and green!!

    Posted 8 years ago #
  4. Hello Katerina - took me a while before I would pluck up courage to swap to linen and working over two, so well done. I think the half cross stitches that are being referred to in this section are the horizontal and vertical stitches seen more regularly these days on charts. I vaguely recall reading somewhere that this particular type of stitch had all but disappeared until the Royal School of Needlework started to promote the re-introduction of them. I think too this is where the mix up has occurred elsewhere on the forum as to the term 'half cross stitches'

    If you think of stitching on say 28 count and you are doing a vertical half cross stitch you stitch up or down over two but across by only one (that's where the 'half' bit comes in)- but still do it as if doing a full crossed-stitch. Similarly if doing a horizontal half cross stitch you stitch up or down over one but across by two.

    As a consequence you end up with either a tall but squashed looking stitch (the vertical) or a flat (on its back) but squashed stitch - the horizontal. There are several charts out there now with these two stitches in and having helped out two ladies who couldn't get to grips with the stitch I can tell you that they do look very effective.

    It's always difficult trying to explain these things in print - so much easier if you can just see it as a large diagram. I've just read this through and find it difficult to understand - yet I can do the flipping stitches! I think I shall do a few on a bit of fabric and bring it to Bradford then if there's anybody there who wants to have a look, they can. Just remember - stitching is for enjoyment so don't go tearing your hair out in frustration. Brenda

    Posted 8 years ago #
  5. Katerina
    Member

    Hi Brenda,

    Thanks for trying to explain - yes it does seem complicated, but I'll get there.

    This pattern will take me a good few months I think, but I'm in no rush, so can just pick it up as and when I feel like it.

    Kat x

    Posted 8 years ago #
  6. 00560910
    Member

    I found that at the start i struggled with evenweaves so i went down to a lower count, 22 or 25, you get a much bigger finished design but it's easier to get the fractionals in. I've just found a 32count off-cut in Truro Fabrics (they have a scraps box, it's brill), so watch this space..................

    Posted 8 years ago #
  7. I never thought that I would be able to work on evenweave, but when I went on my first CSG holiday we were given projects to do on 28ct.evenweave. I was horrified . Jane did offer me a larger count, but I decided that I would have ago. It was amazing how well I found that I got on with it These days all of my stitching is on evenweave . If a chart says Aida I just swop it for evenweave. So I would say to anyone just have ago and see how you get on. Good luck to everyone who try’s you won’t regret it.

    Sally H

    Posted 8 years ago #
  8. Christine Berrett
    Administrator

    I was fortunate enough to learn cross-stitch using evenweave, so I didn't know it was supposed to be difficult! I really don't like using Aida and, like Sally, I will swap it for evenweave in a kit. Only trouble is, I now have a bag of odds and ends of Aida which I have aquired and will probably never use now.

    Posted 8 years ago #
  9. Barbara Stone
    Member

    Like Christine, I started on Aida, switched to Evenweave, and now I wouldn't swap if you paid me. Unfortunately, like Christine, I have a bag full of Aida, some mine and some that was given to me, which I will never use. If anybody wants it, just let me know and we can come to some arrangement about getting it.

    Posted 8 years ago #
  10. 00560910
    Member

    i'm very interested in the aida do you have any in natural shades, if you can post it to me i will let you have some cash for it?

    Posted 8 years ago #
  11. Barbara Stone
    Member

    00560910 - Ring me on 0117 9659917 in the evening if possible, and I can talk to you about the aida. Hope I can help.

    Posted 8 years ago #
  12. Elsa H
    Member

    Just wondering if Katerina ever finished her John Clayton project? My experience of Heritage patterns was to do a Silver Ghost Rolls Royce and a Spitfire for my brother, who worked for Rolls Royce. The fractional "squashed" stitches made a lot of difference to the final effect and I was very pleased with the result. It's difficult to understand, though, why Aida would be supplied as part of the kit, when you would need to puncture part of the blocky bit to form this fractional stitch. Having said that I once did a Teresa Wenzler kit of Rapunzel and that was a nightmare on Aida (which came with the kit). 90 colours, many blended, a hand drawn chart, loads of 3/4 and 1/4 stitches. AAAArgghhh! Taught me a valuable lesson to look carefully at fractional stitches required on a chart, and to have no hesitation in ditching the Aida for evenweave. Hope you made it through, Katerina

    Posted 5 years ago #
  13. Helen F
    Member

    Heritage used to be willing to send the alternative fabric if you'd bought a pack that included Aida but preferred to work on evenweave. This was some years ago, so I don't know if they still do. (A Silhouettes kit I've got from 10 years ago has a note in with an address to send "unworked" fabric to, quoting the design.)

    Posted 5 years ago #
  14. Jean Strange
    Member

    Heritage kits were offered with the choice of 14 count Aida or 27 count evenweave. I remember looking through the kits at a craft show to find the one I wanted on the evenweave. I have just looked at their web site and this still seems to be true you can have Aida or evenweave. I would think they would still change the fabric if you wanted.

    Posted 5 years ago #

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